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. publically, he promised the country that he will use whatever power he has to present another shooting like this. and on nbc's meet the press, california senator dianne feinstein promised he will have a bill to work with. >> a bill to ban assault weapons. it will ban the sale, the transfer, the importation and the possession. >> feinstein said that bill will be introduced on the first day of congress, both in the house and in the senate. more bill press is coming up after the break. live in our chat room. you can join us there at come away armed with facts and the arguments to feel confident in their positions. i want them to have the data and i want them to have the passion. but it's also about telling them that you're put on this planet for something more! i want this show to have an impact beyond just informing. an impact that gets people to take action for themselves. as a human being that's really important. this is not just a spectator sport. [ ♪ theme ♪ ] [ music ] broadcasting across the nation on your radio and on current tv this is "t
was pulled out. it is not clear when the school will be used. >> investigators are gathering what they call cigna to get evidence. it will not discuss what has been seized the gunman's home computer may not reveal much. it was smashed and torn apart. >> it is great to take some time to do that. >> it will take some time to interview the more than 100 witnesses including at some point the children who survived the attack. >> is a very tender issue. and i can tell you that any interviews with any children will be done with professionals, with parents, and with investigators. >> one that can only come after the heart wrenching process for these kids in this community. when say one final goodbye. it is an emotional struggle they will be forced to renew and repeat 26 times here. >> schools across the country are taking extra time to make sure everyone feels secure on school grounds after the incident. that includes schools in baltimore city. lisa robinson joins us from north baltimore with that part of the story. >> school districts reporting things have been quiet and they have been hearing fro
to some useful resources on our website. we hope it can be of some help today in the wake of this devastating tragedy. we move now to tonight's discussion. and joining me on the panel are aarti kohli, senior fellow at uc berkeley's warren institute on war and social policy. paul rogers, environmental writer with the "san jose mercury news." stephen sock, investigative reporter with nbc bay area. and from los angeles, david lazarus, columnist with "the l.a. times." aurti, let's start with you. uc berkeley announced a new scholarship program for undocumented students. why did the university feel it was necessary to support these students? >> well, yes it's very excites news. $1 million from the foundation. and the university really feels strong obligation to these students because they're one of the most vulnerable set of students that we have. the average family income for these students is $24,000 a year. they're not eligible for federal financial aid. they're not eligible for pell grants. and so they've overcome great odds just to get to berkeley and we want to keep them
in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations take a look at the histor
's largest church, will give us her perspective as we enter the fiebl final week before the christmas holiday. >> nbc's lester holt is here with more on the tragedy. good morning to you. >> good morning, savannah. tough weekend. the community needed the president to come here. he met with the first responders, the families. the speech he delivered was not one that many expected. he offered words of comfort, he also laid down a political gauntlet. for the fourth time since taking office, president obama stood before a community shattered by mass murder to offer words of comfort. >> i can only hope it helps for you to know that you're not alone in your grief. >> the president called last friday the worst day of his presidency. and this time he came with more than words of consolation. the president, sketching the outlines of what amounted to a policy statement on gun violence. >> can we honestly say we're doing enough to keep our children, all of them, safe from harm? i've been reflecting this on this the last few days and if we're honest with ourselves, the answer is no. in the coming weeks, i
for the associated press, liz. thanks for being with us. does this time feel different to you? >> yes. i thought the president's remarks last night were significantly different from what we've heard from him and from his predecessors over the last couple decades whenever we had school shootings, shopping mall shootings, theater shootings because there's been the assumption of a kind of ritual until now, where there would be shock, there would be asking what went wrong, the effects on the families. the president or governor leading the nation in some sort of commemoration, but then the certain knowledge that nothing was going to change. last night, the president saying he was going to use whatever power his office held to try to make sure this didn't happen in the same way. to me, that was a turn. >> liz, we heard dianne feinstein on "meet the press" saying she was going to revive the assault weapons ban. listen to senator joe manchin who has a rating of "a" with the nra. >> everything has to be on the table and i think it will be. when you look at it, if dianne is saying assault weapons, i don't
, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a re
consoled the families and survivors telling a weeping crowd that he will use all the powers his office can bear to keep something like this from happening once again. >> the investigation continues. the tight knit community and everyone across the country trying to understand the "why." why a 20-year-old young man who was smart enough to take college courses at the age of 16 could commit such a heinous crime? why a well-to-do mother would have a collection of heavy duty weapons which police say her son used to shoot her in the head, four times, that morning, in her pajamas before he took the same guns to the school to kill innocent children. the guns were her way to connecting with her troubled son. >> she was trying to bond, find ways to bond with him and she told me the guns, she would take them shooting because that was a way a single mom could relate to her son. she would take him out shooting. >>reporter: family and friends describe the shooter as a socially awkward loner but they do not know why he snapped. we start the hour with our team fox coverage with jonathan hunt, back, like,
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)